Presse

The Whole Note
> 27 avril 2016

Critique du disque Folklore Imaginare, par Wendalyn Bartley

sokolovic_transmission1429

 

 

 

 

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The New York Times
> 1er avril 2016

San Francisco Joins the Growing World of Small Operas, par Micheal Cooper

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San Francisco Classical Voice
> 16 mars 2016
S.F. Opera Lab Sets Out to Make a Splash Without Spectacle, par Lisa Houston

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La Scèna Musicale
> Décembre 2011 – Janvier 2012
Ana Sokolović, une imagination pour notre temps par Caroline Rodgers

La Scèna Musicale - Ana Sokolovic

 

 

 

 

 

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Paroles & Musique (SOCAN)
> Numéro hiver 2010 avec Ana Sokolović

A tripartite sensibility: Award-winning composer Ana Sokolovic’s lifelong interest in music, theatre and ballet par Colin Eatock.

Socan > Ana Sokolovic

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Entretien avec Ana Sokolović tiré du DVD Composer?! réalisé par Irène et Anne Marie Messier.

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Portrait d’Ana Sokolović par Isabelle Picard, Circuit : musiques contemporaines, Volume 16, numéro 2, 2006

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Ce qu’ils ont dit à propos d’Ana Sokolović

« Prenuptial celebrations are rarely as hauntingly musical as they are in
Svadba – Wedding, Ana Sokolovic’s a cappella opera that begins in the ordinary world and ends in a magical realm. »

– Jon Kaplan, Now Magazine, 30 juin au 7 juillet 2011, à propos de
l’opéra Svadba – Wedding (The Queen of Puddings Music Theatre) présenté au Berkeley Street Theatre à Toronto

« The unusual feature is that Svadba – Wedding is sung a cappella by six women, four sopranos and two mezzo-sopranos. And what a starry cast it is! [...] Sokolovic has incorporated many influences, from mesmerizing Balkans harmonies, to folk songs, to scat jazz, to new music. The complex tapestry of sound shimmers in beauty. [...] This captivating work is not to be missed. »

– Paula Citron, Classical 96.3FM, juillet 2011, à propos de
l’opéra Svadba – Wedding (The Queen of Puddings Music Theatre) présenté au Berkeley Street Theatre à Toronto

« With six instinctively dedicated and versatile singers, a minimum of multipurpose props, six lights that seem like small suns to roll on stands and be refocused at will, and tonal resources so broad and daring that they reconfigure what one defines as experience, Svadba succeeds in reaching beneath concept into a more fundamental experience of existence. It certainly offers many surprises, much delight, many nudges into ineffable understanding that we come to feel in our bones. Ultimately, it simply gives undeniable cause to celebrate being in the world. For this production of Svadba is most seductive as it demonstrates and indeed seems made of the very same life energy that it would have us, the ones who watch, also know and, yes, celebrate. I’ve waited a long time for theatre to do something like this. »

– James Strecker, James Strecker Reviews the Arts, 4 juillet 2011, à propos de
l’opéra Svadba – Wedding (The Queen of Puddings Music Theatre) présenté au Berkeley Street Theatre à Toronto

« Svadba is a story without a narrative. It is a direct musical experience. It is a vibration that connects the stage with the audience. It is human voice which reconciles by itself and within itself sound and emotion on a level we all share. The exchange between the performers and the audience takes place on a profound level, which overcomes the barrier of linguistic communication. »

– Operatoronto’s Blog, 28 juin 2011, à propos de
l’opéra Svadba – Wedding (The Queen of Puddings Music Theatre) présenté au Berkeley Street Theatre à Toronto

« These days, it’s hard to find an opera composer whose theatrical instincts are daring and sure-footed at the same time. So let’s be thankful that Ana Sokolovic chose Canada as her home. [...] Sokolovic’s own triple-threat background in music, dance and theatre permeates Svadba from beginning to end. Both the music and the text (mostly bits of Serbian poetry) are by her, and it’s pretty clear that the elements of staging and movement were the products of her fecund imagination, as well. [...] The work’s timeless quality is reinforced by Sokolovic’s score. Quirky rhythmic nonsense syllables, vaguely suggestive of pop music beats, blend deftly with ancient-sounding Balkan melodies sung in close harmony. In the hands of a lesser composer, such a mixing of styles might have descended to mere pastiche, but Sokolovic is not a lesser composer. »

– Colin Eatock, The Globe and Mail (Toronto), 26 juin 2011, à propos de l’opéra Svadba – Wedding (The Queen of Puddings Music Theatre) présenté au Berkeley Street Theatre à Toronto

« [...] it is a musical performance piece brimming with imagination. Its premiere at the Berkeley Street Theatre Downstairs, at the hands of Queen of Puddings Music Theatre, was executed with both care and conviction, making it very much worth experiencing. [...] Sokolovic lovingly weaves each scene from text, onomatopoeic effects, lively rhythms and a tonal palette that blends modal harmonies from Medieval times with modern clusters that create their own arresting kinds of sound vibrations. »

– John Terauds, The Toronto Star (Toronto), 24 juin 2011, à propos de l’opéra Svadba – Wedding (The Queen of Puddings Music Theatre) présenté au Berkeley Street Theatre à Toronto

« [...] a magnificent work […] The geographic, linguistic and emotional expansiveness of Sokolovic’s texts carries over into her music, which goes far beyond conventional operatic use of the voice…A full day later, I was still shaken by her performance […] Sokolovic has touched the primeval heart of civilization… […] (and) breathes new life into Canadian music theatre. »

– Tamara Bernstein, The Globe and Mail (Toronto), 27 mars 2008, à propos de l’opéra Love Songs interprété par Lauren Phillips au Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre du Four Seasons Centre à Toronto

« La subtilité timbrique et intellectuelle n’est pas ce qui manque à Ana Sokolovic, dont Pesma a dominé la soirée. Il s’agit d’une oeuvre vocale, dans laquelle un poème est chanté en serbe, en arabe, en français, en kifuliiru (dialecte congolais) et en indonésien, chaque traitement musical dépendant des sonorités de la langue. J’ai beaucoup aimé la berceuse africaine et ses couleurs de vent de sable à la flûte, ainsi que la tristesse de l’incantation en indonésien. »

– Christophe Huss, Le Devoir, 10 mai 2007, à propos du concert 20e anniversaire de l’Ensemble contemporain de Montréal

« Enfin, un disque consacré à la musique d’Ana Sokolovic ! […] la compositrice est installée à Montréal depuis 1992 et est une des artistes les plus originales et talentueuses de sa génération. […] Sa musique est fantaisiste, fortement imagée, et, bien que complexe, elle sonne comme une évidence. » Cote : Excellent

– Isabelle Picard, La Scena Musicale, août 2006, critique de l’album Jeu des portraits

« Premier « coup de cœur », Géométrie sentimentale (1997) d’Ana Sokolovic, pièce qui a connu un réel succès d’estime auprès des amateurs de musique contemporaine et qui a remporté quelques prix (SRC, CACUM). C’est une œuvre contemporaine d’audition naturelle et aisée pour tous, rythmée, sans complexes, pleine d’humour et de rebondissements […] Un rare moment de plaisir de musique contemporaine. »

– Geneviève Beaudet, La Scena Musicale, février 2001, critique de l’album Nouveaux territoires

« The production was dazzling, its verbal, visual and musical wit unfailingly exuberant and its stunning cast fully in command of the vocal pyrotechnics Sokolovic demands. […] Sokolovic achieved a refreshing sound-world of wildly inventive playfulness, filled with the joy of life. »

– Christopher Hoile, Opera News (Toronto), septembre 2005, à propos de l’opéra The Midnight Court

« The libretto is dense with ideas, but comprehensibility was seldom a problem with Sokolovic’s word-setting. The challenge of the text seemed to propel her toward ever more inventive ways of supporting the text musically. […] Sokolovic’s slippery idiom sounded like nothing but itself. »

– Robert Everett-Green, The Globe and Mail (Toronto), 13 juin 2005, à propos de l’opéra The Midnight Court

« […] Montreal-based composer Ana Sokolovic is more inventive than most of her contemporaries in pushing voices and instruments into unexpected sonic patterns […] »

– John Terauds, Toronto Star, 13 juin 2005, à propos de l’opéra The Midnight Court

« But the most exciting things about this show is Sokolovic’s debut as an opera composer. Her score is a joy: witty, concise and contemporary, it constantly blurs the boundaries of the human voice and the “voice” of the six-piece instrumental ensemble. […| Above all, Sokolovic’s fusion of words and music is utterly natural: In a story that supposedly celebrates the earthy side of humanity, the instruments serve reliably as « id amplifiers », subtly driving the action; pulling the droll truths about characters into sharp focus. »

– Tamara Bernstein, National Post (Toronto), 14 juin 2005, à propos de l’opéra The Midnight Court